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A Moment with the Bible

Matthew 10:21-23

It is amazing that the teaching of the gospel would illicit such strong reactions, even to the point that a man’s enemies would be those of his own household. Could a brother really betray a brother or a father his own child? It not only could happen, it did happen during the Roman persecution of the church in the first and second centuries. There are times, when a person’s own life is at stake, that they feel justified in betraying others in order to save themselves. The apostles needed to be aware of these possible reactions so that they were not taken by surprise and respond sinfully. Thus in verse 16 Jesus said, “Be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves.” Though they were not to react to persecution sinfully nor fight back physically (innocent as doves), they were to be smart in how they dealt with the world they were teaching. Paul repeatedly used wisdom to avoid persecution. A Christian must be willing to accept persecution without denying the Lord, but that does not mean he goes looking for it or in any way encourages it.

 

In the midst of this kind of severe trial, who will be saved? Only those who “endure to the end.” Endurance implies a struggle. In other words, it will not be easy to be in the minority so that even close family members are betraying you. It is as those times especially that a Christian tends to question his commitment and wonder if this is what the Lord actually expects of him. But the only person who will be saved is the person who does not give in to the pressure. There may be a desire to bend to the crowd, but think of where that crowd is going on the Day of Judgment. In a parallel passage Jesus warned against being ashamed of Him (Mk. 8:38).

 

Thus, when persecuted, the disciples were urged to flee to the next city. No reason to stay and be killed, but do not quit telling the good news. The phrase, “until the Son of Man comes” most likely refers to Jesus’ “coming” to destroy the nation of Israel for their rejection. Jesus talks more about this “coming” when He speaks of the destruction of Jerusalem (Mt. 24:3; Mk. 14:61-62). We will discuss this in more detail when we come to Matthew 24.